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(C++) array

 

array is one of these topics:

 

See array/std::array/boost::array example 1: comparison for a comparison.

 

 

 

 

C++98 A plain array

 

An array is a collection of elements that can be accessed by the index operator.

 

int myArray[10]; //Create an array that stores ten integers

 

Prefer a std::vector (or perhaps std::array) over an array by default [1-4]. Consider not using arrays in the interface of a class.

 

The first element of an array is at index zero.

 

There are two kinds of arrays:

  1. Static arrays: size known at compile-time, for example 'int v[10]'
  2. Dynamically allocated arrays: size gets determined at run-time, for example 'int * v')

 

 

 

 

 

Advice

 

 

 

 

 

 

C++98TR1 std::tr1::array

 

See std::tr1::array.

 

 

 

 

 

C++98Boost boost::array

 

See boost::array.

 

 

 

 

 

C++11 std::array

 

See std::array.

 

 

 

 

 

References

 

  1. Bjarne Stroustrup. The C++ Programming Language (3rd edition). ISBN: 0-201-88954-4 Chapter 5.8.4 'Use vector and valarray rather than built-in (C-style) arrays'
  2. Herb Sutter and Andrei Alexandrescu. C++ coding standards: 101 rules, guidelines, and best practices. ISBN: 0-32-111358-6. Chapter 76: 'Use vector by default. Otherwise choose an appropriate container'
  3. Marshall Cline, Greg Lomow and Mike Girou. C++ FAQs. ISBN: 0-201-3098301, FAQ 28.02: 'Are arrays good or evil?' (Answer: 'Arrays are evil'
  4. Bjarne Stroustrup. The C++ Programming Language (3rd edition). ISBN: 0-201-88954-4 Chapter C.14.11 'Prefer vector over array'
  5. Bjarne Stroustrup. The C++ Programming Language (3rd edition). ISBN: 0-201-88954-4 5.8.2: 'Take care not to write beyond the bounds of an array'
  6. Joint Strike Fighter Air Vehicle C++ Coding Standards for the System Development and Demonstration Program. Document Number 2RDU00001 Rev C. December 2005. AV Rule 97: 'Arrays shall not be used in interfaces. Instead, the Array class should be used.'
  7. Bjarne Stroustrup. The C++ Programming Language (4th edition). 2013. ISBN: 978-0-321-56384-2. Chapter 7.8. Advice. page 199: '[3] Take care not to write beyond the bounds of an array'
  8. Bjarne Stroustrup. The C++ Programming Language (4th edition). 2013. ISBN: 978-0-321-56384-2. Chapter 7.8. Advice. page 199: '[4] Avoid multidimensional arrays; define suitable containers instead'
  9. Bjarne Stroustrup. The C++ Programming Language (4th edition). 2013. ISBN: 978-0-321-56384-2. Chapter 7.8. Advice. page 199: '[6] Use containers (e.g., vector, array, and valarray) rather than built-in (C-style) arrays'
  10. Bjarne Stroustrup. The C++ Programming Language (4th edition). 2013. ISBN: 978-0-321-56384-2. Chapter 7.8. Advice. page 199: '[7] Use string rather than zero-terminated arrays of chars'
  11. Bjarne Stroustrup. The C++ Programming Language (4th edition). 2013. ISBN: 978-0-321-56384-2. Chapter 12.7. Advice. page 341: '[15] Avoid passing arrays as pointers'
  12. Scott Meyers. C++ And Beyond 2012 session: 'Initial thoughts on Effective C++11'. 2012. 'Prefer std::array to Built-in Arrays'
  13. Scott Meyers. Effective Modern C++ (1st Edition). 2014. ISBN: 978-1-491-90399-5. Item 1, page 17: 'Of course, as a modern C++ developer, you'd naturally preder a std::array to a built-in array'
  14. Bjarne Stroustrup. A tour of C++. 2014. ISBN: 978-0-321-958310. Chapter 11.7.11: 'Prefer array over built-in arrays'
  15. Herb Sutter and Andrei Alexandrescu. C++ coding standards: 101 rules, guidelines, and best practices. ISBN: 0-32-111358-6. Chapter 77: 'Use vector and string instead of arrays'
  16. Bjarne Stroustrup. The C++ Programming Language (4th edition). 2013. ISBN: 978-0-321-56384-2. Chapter 34.7. Advice. page 1007: '[2] Prefer array over built-in arrays'

 

 

 

 

 

Go back to Richel Bilderbeek's C++ page.

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